Pet Business Insurance – What Pet Owners Need to Know About It

Are Your Paws in Protected Hands?

Pet care business insurance is something very few of us think about but really should. Whether you are a pet owner or pet care professional – making certain you are covered when something goes wrong is paramount.

Pet Care Insurance

Pet business insurance I had the great fortune to have met the leader and pioneer in the pet business insurance industry. David Pearsall, CIC, CWCA is Vice President and Co-owner of Business Insurers of the Carolinas which is a multi-line commercial insurance agency specializing in insurance for pet service professionals since 1992. David has headed up Association Liability & Bonding Programs for the largest Pet Sitting and Dog Training Associations in the US, as well as many other national associations for over 20 years. He is a licensed insurance agent in all 50 states and has held the Certified Insurance Counselor (CIC) Designation and the Certified Workers Compensation Advisor (CWCA) Designation since 2002.

Among many other sponsorships, Business Insurers of the Carolinas sponsors the Pet Sitter’s InternationalBusiness Insurers of the Carolinas (PSI) Pet Sitter of the Year Program, the industry’s highest award. I met David during my “crowning” as they say back in early 2010 and from that point forward he has always stood out as the go-to man for questions about insurance. What makes David so genuine and unique is you would never know he’s selling insurance. He actually spends most of his time educating pet professionals (trainers, pet sitters, dog walkers, day care owners etc.) about what they can do to avoid accidents, protect themselves, the animals in their care and their client’s property.

David works closely with the pet care educational associations to bring the greatest coverage possible to both pet owners and pet care professionals while also providing resources on how to prevent accidents from occurring.

While I was initially inspired to bring insurance to the forefront of pet first aid awareness I wanted to do so from the pet owner’s perspective. While there is still so much for pet care business owners to know about, my friend and pet business consultant Bella Vasta from Jump Consulting has covered some great topics on this type of insurance that cater to the pet care professional. As a pet owner though, what the heck does pet business insurance and bonding matter to me?

As a Pet Owner Why Does Pet Business Insurance and Bonding Matter to Me?

David and I jumped on a Skype call to discuss this very matter. Even having done research on what questions to ask and thinking I knew many of the answers – I did not. As a pet owner or owner of property in general, I learned some incredibly valuable tips to protecting me, my animals and my property. I certainly know the next time I have to call a roofer or when the water guys show up to work on my well system today – I am asking to see their insurance certificate! A good way to make an extra buck in our litigious society is to have an accident and sue, it’s sad sad fact.

Listen to This Valuable Conversation about Insurance

We covered a lot of topics pet owners and consequently – pet care providers should know about. We even covered pet insurance, not for the business but for the actual pet. It’s not anything David sells but he still recommends it as a tool to assist in coverage on certain things like diseases – which are not covered by general liability.

In our conversation David helps us understand concepts like animal bailee coverage, what being bonded is, the importance of worker’s compensation even if if a company only has 1 employee (the owner) and makes understanding insurance coverage easy. David makes talking about the topic fun – not something you would think possible about insurance!

Scroll down for the recording, you’re so close just a few more paragraphs! 

Be Proactive Instead of Reactive

Education is the best way to prevent having to use insurance – continuing education helps keep people alert, thinking about the what if’s and preventing more accidents which lead to insurance claims. Obviously this is a natural connection to our pet first aid and CPR course but it’s a very valuable set of skills to have as a pet owner or pet care provider. By being proactive and knowing what is safe for your pets and people coming into your home, you will save yourself pain, time and stress on the back end.

Hiring a pet sitter – especially one with liability insurance and bonding obtained through an educational association – will offer you the best and most precise coverage for that pet care provider’s service. 

Bottom line – if we can limit those accidents that are pure accidents we will all save money, insurance rates will go down, bottom lines improve and the pets, the people that care for them and your property stay safer. Its a sigh of relief knowing and understanding that the person caring for your pet(s) is educated and covered by the correct insurance coverage.

For the full conversation between David and I, hit the play button below.

If you experience an issue that you believe should result in filing a claim, first seek medical help for any humans or animals involved, then contact the insurance agency. For any questions for pet owners hiring a pet care professional using Business Insurers of the Carolinas or for pet care professionals looking to make certain they have the correct coverage, contact David at 1-800-962-4611 Ext #214, or via email at DP@Business-Insurers.com. He’s amazingly responsive, unbelievably knowledgable and a fantastic asset to making our pet industry safer.

5 Reasons Your Dog Needs a Chiropractor

by Dr. Alisha Jacobs, Certified Animal Chiropractor

Your dog has a chiropractor? It is not as crazy as it sounds. There are numerous reasons why regular chiropractic care can significantly improve the quality of life for your dog.

Here are the top 5 reasons your dog needs a chiropractor:

1. They have a body.

Bodywork is extremely important for any being whether that is yourself or your dog. Just as you can experience back and neck pain from day to day activities, so can your dog. It is evolutionarily beneficial for them to hide their pain (they wouldn’t want to become a target for predators) so it can be difficult to tell if they are hurting. However, they do have little aches and pains that can go unaddressed for years. If you have ever had a stiff neck, you can relate that although it is not debilitating, it is quite annoying and after an adjustment or massage, you feel significantly better.

2. They are super silly and playful.

If you have ever watched your dog play, you can see how silly and goofy they can be. They tend to run into things at full speed or jump on and off things with extreme exuberance. All that wear and tear will eventually take a toll on their body. It is much easier to address injuries early on than to wait until arthritic changes set in.

3. Save yourself some money!

The old adage is true: “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure!” Preventive care is extremely important in saving yourself some money, time, and heartache and saving your pet from extra pain and injuries. When you calculate the cost of preventive care (chiropractic, massage, acupuncture, physical therapy) versus the cost of surgery, you end up saving yourself a ton of money.

4. Improved quality of life.

Chiropractic care can help your pet to be more comfortable and pain free by improving motion in their spine, shoulders and hips. By improving joint motion, you can improve overall joint health and reduce muscle tightness and nerve tension. Chiropractic care also stimulates circulation which helps improve organ and immune system function. The goal of care is to improve overall body health which allows your pet to be as happy and healthy as possible for as long as possible.

5. More adventures…

There are so many things that you want to do with your dog whether that is camping and hiking or evening strolls and cuddling on the couch. Unfortunately, once injuries take place, these activities can come to an abrupt halt. By making sure your pet is as healthy as possible, you will ensure many more years of fun and adventures together.

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About the Author:

dr-alicia-jacobsDr. Alisha Jacobs received her bachelors degree in zoology at Colorado State University and her Chiropractic Doctorate degree from the University of Western States in Portland, Oregon. She then attended the rigorous and well known animal chiropractic program at Parker University in Dallas, Texas. The curriculum centered around identification of common veterinary conditions, canine and equine anatomy, and chiropractic condition identification and proper treatment. Dr. Alisha is certified by the American Veterinary Chiropractic Association (AVCA). The AVCA is the premier national accredited animal chiropractic association, where members are held to the highest standards in knowledge and care. 

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Veterinary Specialty Telemedicine

by Melissa Eisenschenk, DVM, DACVD, Veterinary Dermatologist

It is always a good idea to get a second opinion when it really matters.  Just like for humans, there are medical specialists for dogs and cats too.  Specialists are board-certified veterinarians with years of advanced training in specific areas like Dermatology, Anesthesia, or Neurology that know the best cutting edge treatments for pets with special medical conditions.  Does your dog or cat have a medical condition like recurrent ear infections, itchiness, or epilepsy that you would love a veterinary specialist’s opinion on, but you live too far away or don’t want to drive to the city to visit a specialty clinic?

If you would like the best and safest anesthetic to be used when your older pet desperately needs a dental cleaning, there are specialists that can help!  Your family veterinarian can pay a fee to send blood work, biopsies, photos, or videos of your pet to a specialist and get answers about the best and safest treatments rapidly.   In addition, your primary vet can send updates to the specialist over time so medications can be tweaked based on how the patient is doing.   If you would like a second opinion for your pet, but traveling to a referral veterinary clinic is not an option, ask your veterinarian about Veterinary Specialty Telemedicine.

vet telemedicine photo 2
A Veterinary Dermatologist examines a sample to see what bacteria are causing a recurrent ear infection

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About the Author:

Melissa Eisenschenk Veterinary DermatologistDr. Melissa Eisenschenk is a board-certified veterinary dermatologist.  She completed her Bachelor of Science with minors in Animal Science and Chemistry at the University of Wisconsin- River Falls and attended veterinary school at the University of Minnesota.  After vet school, she was in private practice for 4 years in Rochester and Minneapolis, and then returned in 2006 to the University of Minnesota for a dermatology residency (3 year program) and Master’s degree. She passed dermatology board exams in 2009.  Dr. Eisenschenk worked out of the Oakdale Animal Emergency and Referral Center as a Veterinary Dermatologist for 3.5 years before starting Pet Dermatology Clinic.  She has a bunch of city chickens, a husband, and 2 daughters, Mae and Bea. 

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An introduction to iridology

Iridology is a great supplemental natural modality that can be used with dogs, cats, people, horses, and so on to help analyze various organs and systems in the body to see which are potentially weak and which potentially strong. You can then use this information to lend additional support to those systems that may need a bit of extra help. Because iridology is an analytical tool, it is best when used in conjunction with another natural modalities, such as essential oils, homeopathy, chiropractic, and so on. It is not intended to be a stand-alone tool.

Iridology as we know it today was first developed by Dr. Ignatz von Peczely and Reverend Nils Liljequist in the late 1800s. The two men worked independently, but came up with charts and “iris maps” that were actually quite similar. According to the book Visions of Health, iridology is the “art and science of analyzing the color and structure of the iris of the eye to gain valuable health information.”  Originally, it was developed for people, but more recently Dr. Mercedes Colburn mapped the equine, feline, and canine irises. Her maps allow pet owners and veterinarians alike to glean valuable information from studying a particular animal’s irises.

The iris—the colored portion of the eye—of every single eye is different. No two animals have the same iris, and even in the same animal, the left and right iris can be very different. These differences are all used by iridologists to gain an understanding of the body’s systems and how well they are functioning. For example, if the fibers in the iris are tight, or close together, the body is generally strong and therefore more resistant to disease (in other words, it has a strong terrain). Loose fibers, or ones that aren’t close together, generally indicate a body that is weaker and more susceptible to disease. But iridologists can go deeper than that. Using the iris maps, they can gain insight into which organs and systems may be weaker or out of balance. Describing the entire iris map is beyond the scope of this article, but we will touch on the highlights of what the irises indicate. If you are interested in learning more or seeing what iridology can reveal about your pet, go to Dr. Colburn’s website, www.throughtheeyeinternational.com, or set up an appointment with a qualified animal iridologist.

Psora and drug deposits

Often, iridologists observe colored spots of varying densities in the iris. These spots can be either psora or drug deposits. Psora are heavy, dark patches that typically indicate inherited chemicals. Drug or other chemical deposits show up in the iris as bright yellow, red, or orange spots. Usually, they are smaller than the psora and are scattered around the iris.

Weakened constitutions

The presence of lesions, either lacunae (closed lesions), crypts (small, closed, very dark lesions), or “open” (lesions that are open on one side and closed on the other), indicate inherited or acquired weaknesses in the body. Based on their location, the iridologist can determine which areas of the body are weaker and therefore need to be strengthened.

Toxic, slow-moving bowels

When a bowel is full of toxins and moving sluggishly, the iris shows lines called radii solaris. These long, dark lines branch out (seemingly from the pupil) like bicycle spokes. The darker and denser the “spoke,” the more intense the toxic condition. Generally speaking, the presence of radii solaris indicate a need to detoxify the bowls and body. They may also indicate parasitic infection.

Excessive nerve tension

Nerve rings, which are formed by the iris fibers buckling and appear as concentric circles or partial arcs in the iris, indicate excessive nerve tension. They can indicate that the individual is under stress, which can present as indigestion, muscle tenseness, headache, etc. If the nerve rings are heavy, it suggests that the subject needs to relax and reduce stress.

Skin issues

When there is a darkened rim at the periphery of the iris (called a scurf rim), it indicates that the skin is underactive and isn’t eliminating properly. This further suggests that toxins and waste materials may be accumulating faster than the skin can eliminate them. The scurf rim can vary greatly—it may be thin, thick, dark, or light, but in all cases, it means that toxins are not being eliminated fast enough. In this case, a reduction in the toxins coming in may be of great benefit.

Slow lymph system

A slow, sluggish, and underperforming lymph system appears in the iris as small, cloud-like spots. Generally, the spots are found towards the outside of the iris, but they can move closer to the interior in some instances. These spots, which are called lymphatic rosary, look like a string of pearls or the beads of a rosary, which is where they got their name. The fact that the spots are white indicates inflammation. If the spots are yellow or light brown, it indicates that the condition has existed for a while. When you see this, it may indicate that there is not a proper amount of exercise (remember, the lymph is moved through exercise).

Chemical imbalances

When there is a chemical imbalance in the body, a solid white ring circling the iris at the periphery appears. This is known as a sodium ring, and it is a deposit in the corneal tissues.

These are just a few of the things that iridology can help you see. To fully understand iridology, see a trained iridologist or review the equine, feline, and/or canine iris maps that Dr. Colburn developed. As with all the other modalities, iridology is meant to help support you in making sure your pet’s body is balanced and strong. It is a great analytical tool that you can use to help guide you in seeing which parts of your pet’s body may need extra support so that they can be strengthened, revitalized, and brought back into harmony with the body’s other systems.

Conclusion

These are just a few of the things that iridology can help you see. To fully understand iridology, see a trained iridologist or review the equine, feline, and/or canine iris maps that Dr. Colburn developed. As with all other modalities, iridology is meant to help support you in making sure your pet’s body is balanced and strong. It is a great analytical tool that you can use to help guide you in seeing which parts of your pet’s body may need extra support so that they can be strengthened, revitalized, and brought back into harmony with the body’s other systems.

Kristin Clark started Canine Health Promotion so she could help dogs thrive.  Serving clients whose dogs range from top performance dogs to beloved family pets, Kristin is passionate about helping all dogs live their best lives. She truly understands this journey, because she walks it herself every single day. With four dogs of her own, she knows just how hard it can be to find help for health issues using conventional means.  Kristin is board certified by the American Council of Animal Naturopathy as a Carnivore Nutrition Consultant and a Small Animal Naturopath, and devotes a great deal of time to researching how best to help dogs live their optimal lives. Kristin also writes for, edits, and publishes Raw Pet Digest, an international online magazine devoted to helping dogs and cats live and thrive naturally.

Easy Wellness Assessment You Can Do Yourself

By Kristin Clark, Founder and President, Canine Health Promotion

As good pet parents, we continually do everything we can to make sure our beloved pets are happy and thriving. However, how do we really know whether our animals are healthy? Sadly, it’s become true that people often think their dogs and cats are in a state of health when really they aren’t. However, because the signs that their bodies are not operating at an optimal level—indicators like skin allergies; a dry or dull coat; bad breath; tooth decay; smelly, soft, and excessive poop; and obesity; to name just a few—are so common, we don’t even blink anymore when our pets experience them. Further, when our pets are young, they may seem to be healthy, but there is a breaking point (which is different for each animal) that they experience where their bodies can no longer handle the toxins that are being flooded into their systems, and they present with disease, illness, and/or chronic pain. In this post, we explore this topic by going over some of the ways you can do a wellness assessment on your dog or cat, to ensure that they are in optimal health. This is a helpful exercise to get in the habit of doing on a regular basis, and to do no matter how you feed your pets or whether you choose to apply traditional preventives (such as flea and tick treatments or heartworm medication) or not. My point is that every single animal should exhibit wellness in all of the following areas, and if they don’t, you need to adjust something to help them rebalance and come back to a state where they can thrive.

Remember, our animals are not machines. Their bodies are continually working to maintain homeostasis, or balance. That balance is affected by every single thing that goes into their bodies—the food they eat, the pesticides on the grass they run through, the preventives that they receive—as well as things like their quality of sleep, the amount of exercise they get, their owner’s mood, and so on. What this means is that you must continually attend to the clues your dog or cat is giving you to determine whether they are thriving or if something needs to be tweaked. It doesn’t have to be a daunting task, either. Once you are in the habit of regularly looking at them, noticing their energy level, and paying attention to what they feel like when you pet them, you will find that you are doing these mini “Wellness assessments” every day. In fact, it will become so second nature that you won’t even notice you’re doing it, but you will notice if something is a bit “off” and you need to help your dog or cat rebalance.

So, what should you start training yourself to look for and notice? Remember that you know your pet better than anyone else, and pay attention to your intuition if something just doesn’t seem right. Beyond that, though, there are some good indicators to be able to tell if your pet is thriving. These are especially useful if you are new to thinking this way, and maybe have a pet that has some of the common issues we frequently see crop up in our companion animals. If that’s the case, you may be so used to these issues that your brain doesn’t notice them anymore, so when you start looking at your pet to really assess their wellness, step back a bit and practice looking at them objectively.

Coat

A dog or cat that is thriving should have a shiny, soft coat. When you pet them, you shouldn’t come away with an excess of oily residue on your hands.

While they will still shed according to the dictates of their species and breed, the shedding is usually reduced. The skin will be supple and in good condition, and it will be free from hot spots, allergies, and excessive itchiness.

Eyes

When a dog or cat is in optimal health, its eyes are clear and bright. No matter what breed your dog or cat is, and whether they are a purebred or a mix of many breeds, their eyes should not be weepy or runny.

Parasites

A dog or cat with a strong, balanced immune system doesn’t suffer from flea and tick infestations, even when you don’t use conventional flea and tick preventives (such as Frontline). While they may pick up a flea or tick every once in a while, particularly in areas where those insects abound, it never gets out of balance.

Body Condition/Weight

A dog or cat that is at the peak of health is lean and muscular. When you look down at them from above, you should be able to see a narrowing in their waist. When you touch them, you should be able to easily feel their ribs. Additionally, they don’t have excess fat on their chest or back.

Oral Health

A healthy, vital dog or cat’s teeth are sparkling white and clean, and they don’t have bad breath. The gums are not excessively red or inflamed, and there isn’t a buildup of plaque or tartar.

Odor

A dog or cat that is balanced and thriving doesn’t have a strong odor—in fact, they don’t have much, if any, smell at all!

Stool and Anal Glands

A thriving dog or cat has small, dense, compact stools, and they move their bowels less frequently than an animal that isn’t thriving. Because they have to strain a bit to defecate, their anal glands are kept clean, clear, and in good working order—without frequent trips to the vet or groomer to have their anal glands cleared.

Behavior

Dogs and cats that are truly healthy are neither lethargic nor hyperactive, but instead have an appropriate amount of energy for their species, breed, age, and individual character.

Mental Ability

Healthy, thriving dogs and cats have incredible mental capabilities. Their brains can function at their optimal level, right along with their bodies and their spirits, which means they are extraordinarily perceptive and able to focus.

Endurance

When dogs and cats are properly supported, they have lots of endurance within the parameters of their individual and breed characteristics. This is especially nice for performance animals, such as dogs that are used for agility, showing, and hunting.

Aging

Dogs and cats that are flourishing do so even when they’re what society terms “senior”—9, 10, 11, or 12 for dogs (and in fact, well beyond those ages), and 14, 15, or 16 (or more!) for cats! They still have energy, are mentally sharp, and exhibit all the other qualities of a thriving animal.

Take some time to really assess your pet each day, until it becomes habit. Remember, you know them best, and there are lots of ways to check to make sure that they are thriving. These are some of the biggest ones, and once your pet is thriving, you will notice big changes in all of these areas, no matter what age, breed, species, or gender they are.

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Kristin Clark started Canine Health Promotion so she could help dogs thrive.  Serving clients whose dogs range from top performance dogs to beloved family pets, Kristin is passionate about helping all dogs live their best lives. She truly understands this journey, because she walks it herself every single day. With four dogs of her own, she knows just how hard it can be to find help for health issues using conventional means.  Kristin is board certified by the American Council of Animal Naturopathy as a Carnivore Nutrition Consultant and a Small Animal Naturopath, and devotes a great deal of time to researching how best to help dogs live their optimal lives. Kristin also writes for, edits, and publishes Raw Pet Digest, an international online magazine devoted to helping dogs and cats live and thrive naturally.