The Power of Recycling

By Benjamin Blackburn, Marketing Merchandiser for Pet Waste Eliminator

Recycling is by far one of the best ways you can have a positive impact on the world we live in. I know some individuals, companies, and facilities feel like they can’t make a difference by recycling, but after some intense research, I have compiled some stats that may change that perspective.

Why should you be recycling? 

Let’s start off with the big WHY!  As I stated above, recycling helps protect and preserve the environment one piece of trash at a time.  It helps reduce pollution that is caused by waste and reduces the need for raw materials so that rainforests can be preserved.

As recycling saves a ton of energy, it also reduces greenhouse gases and thus helps to tackle climate change.  When we recycle, materials are reprocessed into new products and as a result, the amount of trash sent for incineration reduces significantly.  Reducing, reusing, and recycling is very important because it decreases the amount of waste on the planet and preserves natural resources by maintaining space and decreasing landfills.

When it comes to pet waste products, Pet Waste Eliminator is definitely on the green train and striving to make the earth a better place with efficient products.

Using a product that contains recycled content helps reduce waste and pollution; completing the Recycling Circle.  Products like the Pet Waste Eliminator poopie bags E40 & E41 help to ensure that recyclable materials will continue to be recycled and not wasted.  These pet waste bags are made from 100% recycled materials and have a total thickness of 3.15 Mils.  That’s thicker than a Heavy Duty trash bag, so you will not feel any warmth when picking up waste and it eliminates any transmission of bacteria.  In this day and age you might think that creating a bag that’s made from 100% recycled material sounds easy, but as it turns out – it was a “nifty” trick that took a lot of time and effort.

Now you’re probably wondering “What do I do with waste after I pick it up?”  There are a number of things you can do with pet waste after it’s collected:

  • Most obvious solution is flushing it down the toilet
  • Another option is to bury you pet’s droppings…be sure to bury the waste in several locations and at least 12 inches deep
  • An easier & cleaner solution would be to simply bag it up in one of Pet Waste Eliminator’s poopie bags (E40 or E41) and throw it in the recycling bin

What if we stopped recycling?

Nobody ever stops and thinks; what would happen if we didn’t recycle?  What would the world look like if we all just said “no” to recycling and continued producing the same amount of waste?

Honestly, you wouldn’t see any changes tomorrow if the world decided not to recycle.  However, the landfills that currently handle all of the waste would take the hugest hit.  On average, a person generates 4 pounds of waste per day.  If all of their waste goes to the trash, multiply it by 7.484 billion people on earth.  That’s 29.9 billion pounds of waste in landfills every single day.

Now take all of that and multiply it by the days in the month.  Try a year, or even a decade.  It doesn’t take long to see the compounding long term effects that not recycling would have on our precious earth.

To sum it all up, you as an organization or even an individual can help the Earth by simply building those healthy recycling habits in your facilities, work areas, and homes.

The goal with Pet Waste Eliminator is pretty simple. We want to make sure there are Pet Waste Stations filled with the highest quality bags all over the country so pet owners won’t have to scramble to find a bag when their pets make a mess.

This wide selection of high-quality of Pet Waste Systems includes Dog Waste Bag Dispenser Boxes, Pet Waste Stations, Trash Cans and Dog Waste Bags.

Quick Facts:

  • The average person generates 4 lbs. of trash daily
  • A glass container can go from a recycling bin to a store shelf in as few as 30 days
  • Americans throw away about 25,000,000 bottles an hour

Quick Tips:

  • Reduce, Reuse, Recycle
  • Buy recycled
  • Anticipate Recycling

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About the Author:

Benjamin Blackburn is a Marketing Merchandiser for Pet Waste Eliminator based out of Houston, Texas but also serves customers throughout the United States. He has always had a passion helping others and contributing his talents for the team to succeed as a whole.  Creating and developing products that help customers keep dog left overs off of the ground is Benjamin’s top priority in his Marketing role at Pet Waste Eliminator.

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Social Learning in Dogs

By Gaby Dufresne-Cyr, Owner and Founder of the Dogue Shop

What is social learning in dogs, and why bother with social cognitive learning theory (SCT)? Here is a look at a theory which is rapidly changing dog training, but more specifically, dog behavior modification. The topic is complex; therefore, allow me to break it down into a few sections.

What is social cognitive learning theory?

Social cognitive learning is an extension of Albert Bandura’s social learning theory developed in the 1960s. One definition for social learning is reciprocal determinism based on social influences developed during attachment. The social bond directly influences imitation. In the SCT the attachment style is the most important aspect of learning.

Bandura concluded his observations after he conducted an experiment we now refer to as the bobo doll. Researchers exposed children to aggressive behaviors exhibited by adults towards toys. Researchers found children who observed adults inflicting aggressive behaviors to toys were more likely to replicate the aggression than children exposed to passive behavior. Furthermore, the attachment of the child towards the adult yielded more aggressive behaviors than observations from strangers.

Bandura explained the model with the use of a triangle. Each part of the triangle is bi-directional and must be present for learning to occur. Break one direction and learning ceases. The theory states a secure attachment between individual subjects allows for learning to take place when placed in a favorable environment; therefore, if all three components are present, learning takes place. The revolutionary process has to do with cognition. Problem solving links to attachment to problem solving because it creates a trusting association between the two individuals.

A secure attachment, in turn, allows the cognitive process to flourish. However, if the environment is stressful, distracting, or uncomfortable: too hot, too cold, noisy, smelly, cluttered, too small, too big, etc. learning will be very difficult, not to say impossible. Another important factor influences learning: the individuals involved. Both parties within the triangle need to be predisposed to learning. The biological environment we call the body is directly responsible to successes or failures. If you need to urinate, you will not teach or learn. If a dog needs to urinate, we obtain the same result. Below are the necessary components for social cognitive learning to occur.

  • Human
    • Biology
    • Cognition
  • Dog
    • Biology
    • Cognition
  • Attachment
    • Secure
  • Environment
    • Climate
    • Size
    • Sensory

Although some components can change over time, others will remain the same. Behaviorism remains essential and we will not replace one theory with another. I propose you add it to your tool box.

Why bother with social cognitive theory?             

Social cognitive learning is not only fun, it saves training time, effort, emotional disturbances, and cost. It prevents stress, confusion, emotional overload, and weight problems associated with overfeeding treats. It also reduces aggression and eliminates punishment and the use of aversive tools such as chokes, prongs, electric shock, or e-collars. Any method can be made abusive and inadequate, but social learning breaks the rule.

A person cannot create a triangle from pokes and kicks. Problem solving will not occur if electric shocks or “vibrations” are administered to animals. In my experience, the social cognitive learning model prevents and eliminates abuse. Extreme positive reinforcement only and punishment based trainers cannot establish a relationship if one of the pieces of the triangle is missing or if one direction is not functional.

Another reason to hop-on the social cognitive learning bandwaggon is the effectiveness and speed at which behavior modification occurs. Here is an example: you want to train a service dog to accomplish the open drawer behavior. With behaviorism’s classical and operant conditioning, it would take month, if not years, to shape the behavior. If we apply SCT learning to the training process, we can train complex behavior chains in a matter of minutes. I do not know about you, but to me, that is amazing and practical when dogs needed to know their behaviors, say, yesterday.

Furthermore, SCT learning facilitates behavior modification because it addresses problems at their source: emotions. Behaviorism works toward behavior changes, positive or negative. Social cognitive learning changes emotions at their fundamental core; consequently, SCT is an excellent addition to your toolbox. I know, I am repeating myself, but the process is so amazing. Imagine dogs that not only learn; imagine dogs that have learned how to learn; consequently, they offer you behaviors you have just demonstrated.

Conclusion

Social cognitive learning theory will not replace behaviorism – it will complement it. Our responsibility towards animals is to train them in the least amount of time, limit financial strain, and lessen emotional disturbance as much as possible. When we can, our role is to utilize all the knowledge available to us. I believe, as an animal professional, attachment and imitation can help us train and modify behavior without lengthy protocols or emotional disturbance, so why turn a blind eye?

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About the Author:

Gaby Dufresne-Cyr, Owner and Founder of the Dogue Shop, has been training animals professionally for over 30 years. She offers innovative training programs, workshops, conferences, and seminars which will undoubtedly challenge your dog knowledge. Gaby works with a wide variety of species but concentrates on canidae (wolves, coyotes, and dogs), equidae (zebras, horses, mules, and donkeys), and muriadae (rats and mice). Her favorite animal to train is the giraffe. Gaby spends most of her time bettering the animal community however she can. Her perspective on life is to never think within the box, for the box limits you.

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Preparing for Hurricane Season

By Michelle Patel, Owner of Pet Life Saver in Jacksonville, Florida

Hurricane season is upon us.  When making preparations for possible evacuations, it is important to plan for our furry family members also.  The last thing you want to do is leave your pet home in an emergency to fend for him or herself.  Preplanning takes much of the stress out of an emergency situation when it arises.  Before the storm is approaching, do some research on animal friendly shelters.  Know your evacuation routes and scope out hotels that are pet friendly. Keep their contact information handy so that you can book a room as soon as you know you will need one. When disasters are imminent, rooms (especially pet friendly ones) book up quickly. Keeping your pet up to date on vaccinations is not only good for their health, but also up to date vet records are often a requirement for bringing an animal to a shelter or hotel.

Evacuating as soon as possible will greatly reduce your travel time. The closer people wait until mandatory evacuations, the more congested the roadways get. When traveling with your pet, you will want a minimum of three days worth of medications, food/treats, toys, water, a towel or blanket, litter and a litter pan (for cats), a first aid kit, paper towels, trash bags, carrier, and leash/harness. If you keep these items in a large bin, that is one item off of your to do list when an emergency strikes.  Everything is already together (except for the perishables that need to be packed last minute), and you can simply grab the bin.

If you do not plan to travel with your pet, have several boarding options available. Do research ahead of time to know which vet offices and boarding facilities will board during a disaster.  Make sure you have their 24-hour contact information handy, as one can never be sure when a disaster will strike.

If you decide not to evacuate for whatever reason, figure out the safest room in your home and set up camp together there. Make sure there are no unsafe areas where frightened pets can run off to, hide in, and escape your reach.  Keep poisonous substances out of your pet’s reach.  Bring any outdoor pets inside at the first sign of approaching danger. Keeping dogs on leashes and cats in carriers prevents you from having to round them up if you need to leave in a hurry.  Monitor the situation via radio, television, or cell phone regularly, and do not leave your home until it is safe to do so.

Sometimes disaster can strike while you are away, and you cannot get to your pets at home.  It is always advisable to have someone trustworthy that can access your home and care for your pets in the event you are unable to.  Carrying a card on your person at all times with instructions on who to contact in the event of an emergency is helpful to emergency personnel if anything were ever to happen to you and you could not get to your pets.

The first line of defense against a pet getting lost is ensuring proper identification.  Ideally, two forms of identification should be on the pet at all times.  A permanent form of ID (such as a microchip or tattoo) is recommended.  Since these are permanent, they cannot be removed from your pet.  A veterinarian can read these and get in touch with you.  Additionally, a collar with identification tags containing the address and phone number to the pet parent increases the likelihood that someone who finds your pet will be able to reach out to you.  It is critical to keep the contact information up to date at all times.  GPS trackers that are located on your pet’s collar are also becoming quite popular.  In case you ever need to show proof of ownership, it is a good idea to always carry a photo of you and your pet.  When it comes to our pets, we can never be too cautious.

Always being prepared for a hurricane would come in handy if any other emergency were to come about as well.  We never know when a fire, flood, tornado, break in, terrorist attack, etc. could happen.

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About the Author:

Michelle Patel is the owner of Pet Life Saver, where she teaches pet CPR and first aid classes.  She has lived in Jacksonville for the past 14 years.  Ever since Michelle can remember, animals have always held a special place in her heart.  She currently has three cats: Baby Girl, General, and Manny.
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Till Death Do Us Part

By Yolanda Steyn, Co-founder of EETO (Extreme Equestrian Trail Organization of South Africa) and Director of Opposital, Horses & Humans in Harmony

One of the most challenging decisions for an animal lover is the decision to set their beloved animals free if they are suffering physically. Letting go – why is it so difficult for humankind?  Some clients have reported that it is harder saying goodbye to their furry family than to their own human family. The reason for this? Unconditional love.  Animals don’t have time and space restrictions like humans. They don’t need Google Maps or Rolex watches.  Their love is unconditional. They are not bound by written contracts. Their existence is to be in balance, to make the very best of every day. They are givers, not receivers. They don’t fear death.

A session I did on Freedom Day 2017 taught me some valuable lessons.

A client asked me to assist with their grey beautiful mare and 5 month old foal.  The foal had septicemia in her knee joint.  The vet advised the guardian to put the foal down.  They wanted to have confirmation that this would be the right thing to do.

I started the session with the question – how does Topaz (the dam) say good bye to Misty (her foal) if this is the desired outcome?  Even my usual background music sounded like funeral music that day.  It is much harder for humans to accept death. We feel more emotional dealing with foals as we hold life expectancies, dreams, and hopes for them. Topaz told me that death is not like we perceive it.  Death is the beginning not the end – a paradox. Lesson one.

During the session, I was reminded by Willow, a bay gelding that visited our yard, that communicated we need to change our “think”.  He didn’t call it the thinking process, he called it THINK. THINK in bold capital letters.  This is a tall order. We mustn’t think that the foal will perceive her death like we do. Lesson two.

Topaz is an extremely proud mother. She carries the energy of serenity around her. For her it is more important to feel that she has given everything.  No regrets.  Topaz is saddened by the event but she knows how important freedom is to a horse.  Without freedom they can’t be a horse.  She was very humble when she gave me these words. (My heart goes out to all the horses that are trapped in their stables or small paddocks. They need space to move, space to be free.)

You can’t have the pasture and not enjoy it.  This will be far worse than letting her foal go.  It is her choice to let her foal go. Setting Misty free.  Topaz asked that the owner be present with the procedure.  The presence of the owner would comfort her.  She asked to be with Misty and that the proceedings are done in the pasture. It would be less stressful.

Horses don’t judge us. They don’t experience death like we do.  For them it is walking through another gate. No expectations. Without freedom you cannot exist. Without freedom you are trapped. Lesson 3.

Misty shared that we all live in different time zones. Sometimes we live past each other. We don’t understand each other.  All of us are on our own journey. Our own belief system. She has tried hard to recover, but it wasn’t meant for her. She wanted to be free.  Free to play and to run once again.  Free to be a playful foal.  With her injury it is impossible for her.  She saw her death as traveling to a different time zone. She was ready to be parted from her mom in her physical body.

I am always amazed by the words of wisdom horses share with me during a session.  Topaz shared that we all have expectancies in life. We judge ourselves to live up to those expectations. It is human nature to set these expectancies too high. Humans often feel like failures because it is impossible to live up to those expectations. This creates fear and guilt. Horses live in the present moment. No fear and no guilt.  Only truth. The truth was that the foal got injured. It wasn’t our human expectation.  Please don’t let guilt or fear take the place of love. Lesson 4.

I received a message from the guardian later that afternoon to say that the procedure went smoothly and she highlighted the significance that it was Freedom Day.

Till death do us part – freedom is awaiting us.

*Names of the horses have been changed

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About the author:

Yolanda is an animal communicator and equine specialist. Looking after the well-being of horses is her first priority. Her passion is to create harmony between people and horses. She studied Human Resources and Learning Development and is a qualified Sanef Level 2 Western Instructor. She is also a registered healer with the Healing Animal Organization. She was one of the first groups of students in South Africa to train in the Mastersons Method and she is also a qualified TTouch practitioner. Yolanda is the Co-founder of EETO – Extreme EquestrianTrail Organization of South Africa and the director of Opposital. Additionally, she has played a vital role in developing Sanesa Western School Shows.

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